February 14, 2007

Whiplash

These two headlines, side by side on Google News, just make me twitch.

New York Times - Bush says Iran is source of deadly bombs:

WASHINGTON, Feb. 14 -- President Bush said today he is certain that elements of the Iranian government are supplying deadly roadside bombs that kill American troops in Iraq, even if the innermost circle of the government is not involved. ...

Los Angeles Times - U.S. backpedals accusations against Iran:

WASHINGTON -- U.S. officials from President Bush to a top general in Iraq said Wednesday that there was no solid evidence that top officials in Iran had ordered deadly weapons to be sent to Iraq for use against American soldiers, backing away from claims made at a Baghdad presentation by military and intelligence officials earlier this week. ...

And I was despairing that the hamster wheel wouldn't start up again, because it hardly seems possible that two so very different headlines could be describing the same thing. But then I saw this headline and I thought, "Oh, well, that's all right then."

Newsweek - Bush seems to be intentionally sending mixed messages on Iran:

Feb. 14, 2007 - President Bush stepped into the East Room on Wednesday with a clear message about the intel on Iran: the situation is murky. ...

And while this headline at the Washington Post offered further reassurance that someone, somewhere, was really paying attention, Skepticism Over Iraq Haunts U.S. Iran Policy, this other one there was just hilarious: Bush puzzled by doubters. That's enough to make a person crease themselves laughing, and I did. And then I remembered that this entire, thoroughly predictable, possible train wreck rests in the hands of a compulsive liar who's surprised that people don't automatically believe him after six long years of listening to his whoppers. A liar who tells us that he doesn't want war, while they're trying to negotiate and he's putting the preparations for an attack in place

Posted by natasha at February 14, 2007 09:03 PM | Iran | TrackBack(1) | Technorati links |
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