September 06, 2005

Other Stuff

While Katrina's and then Bush's sacking of the Gulf has been the subject of most of our attention, here are some other things that have been in the news.

At least 147 are dead in Indonesia after a plane crashed into a Jakarta neighborhood shortly after takeoff.

Before Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist's body was cold from losing his battle with thyroid cancer, Bush declared the fresh-faced sphinx John Roberts ("One White Guy", as per The Daily Show) to be his nominee for Chief Justice. E.J. Dionne thinks that the confirmation process might not go as smoothly as Bush is hoping.

I've just got to know who wrote the blitheringly obvious title for this AP article: Next Bush Nominee May Be a Conservative. Words fail me.

The Saudi Arabian police have been battling an al Qaida cell in a gun battle that's killed three police officers and five guerrillas. The goal of the cell is reportedly to overthrow the Saudi monarchy.

A typhoon has hit Japan, leaving 13 people missing or dead, causing landslides and forcing the evacuation of around 100,000 others. In other news, Congressman Dennis Hastert has suggested that the Japanese government consider not rebuilding a country that gets so regularly pummeled by nature ;)

Members of al Qaida are thought to have attacked the Baghdad Interior Ministry in broad daylight, while suicide bombings and other attacks on the occupation forces proceeded apace throughout the country. In other Iraq news, Abu Musab Zarqawi appears to have captured an entire town near the Syrian border.

Russia says they don't want Iran referred to the Security Council, while the leaders of Britain and Germany have been coming around to saying they support more diplomatic measures. Though the political situation is potentially explosive, actual nuclear weapons are most likely years away. It isn't that big a stretch to wonder if Iran's plan to stop trading oil in dollars is at least part of the reason why hostilities have been simmering.

US forces are still fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan, but the opium trade there is going swimmingly and a fair bit of the revenue goes right back to funding the Taliban.

Egypt is about to have a multi-candidate presidential election, which is a pretty big deal for them. Let's see how that works out for them, with luck, satisfactorily.

Folic acid really, really does work to decrease serious birth defects in the population.

Experts are concerned that an area of bulging ground in Oregon may signal the rise of a new volcano.

Scientists are warning that global warming may leave 50 million more people hungry by mid-century.

Mars not only has water, it may be lousy with water. Frozen, but hey, if we're going to go all that way we won't be too fussy.

Posted by natasha at September 6, 2005 02:24 AM | Recommended Reading | Technorati links |
Comments

2 wonderful articles today-The USGS is saying that the high plains aquifer could be depleted faster than expected and Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, OK,So. Dakota, Texas and Wyoming depend on the water. And from the Nature Conservancy's Reef Resilience Program-- they intend to protect the reefs of Fla. by protecting what's left by covering it from the sun(artificial shade). Now I just saw the power of Katrina, and the answer to global warming is this? Perhaps I'm missing something here but these are the stories that pretty much say we are screwed. The reason for this program, of course, is not to protect the food source or the corals which protect the peninsular Florida from storm surge but the $1 billion tourist industry. Now I applaud the science community for their efforts but isn't this grasping at straws. 50 % of the world's population lives along the coast and benefits from the cheap protein. Coral reefs are the nurseries of the world and 20% are dead, 20% are thought to be dying and now it's gotten down to saving the healthiest parts. We are in some deep trouble. Katrina is only the flagship of the coming changes and as the food and water sources dry up there will be no place left to hide. Even the rich will suffer.

Posted by: 11 dogs at September 6, 2005 06:11 AM

2 wonderful articles today-The USGS is saying that the high plains aquifer could be depleted faster than expected and Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, OK,So. Dakota, Texas and Wyoming depend on the water. And from the Nature Conservancy's Reef Resilience Program-- they intend to protect the reefs of Fla. by protecting what's left by covering it from the sun(artificial shade). Now I just saw the power of Katrina, and the answer to global warming is this? Perhaps I'm missing something here but these are the stories that pretty much say we are screwed. The reason for this program, of course, is not to protect the food source or the corals which protect the peninsular Florida from storm surge but the $1 billion tourist industry. Now I applaud the science community for their efforts but isn't this grasping at straws. 50 % of the world's population lives along the coast and benefits from the cheap protein. Coral reefs are the nurseries of the world and 20% are dead, 20% are thought to be dying and now it's gotten down to saving the healthiest parts. We are in some deep trouble. Katrina is only the flagship of the coming changes and as the food and water sources dry up there will be no place left to hide. Even the rich will suffer.

Posted by: 11 dogs at September 6, 2005 06:12 AM

We're not too worried about that volcano here in Bend, it's pointed at Eugene!

Actually, we've been monitoring the bulge 24/7 in conjunction with UO since its' discovery a couple of years ago - quite an impressive room full of really cool equipment. Impressive staff as well, two faculty (and your humble computer guy) witnessed St. Helens erupt in '80 and have spent considerable time around her since. The unspoken consensus is that it will not be an explosive eruption as we saw then, rather more the likely a "weepage" much like when a blister pops.

Witness the past week, though, and having a volcano in the backyard may not be quite as, oh... eccentric, as it has been.

Posted by: Thomas Ware at September 6, 2005 09:24 AM