September 02, 2004

Dubya's acceptance speech.

This magpie didn't have the stomach to watch or listen to it. But maybe you're made of sterner stuff.

So if you caught the acceptance speech, do you think Dubya closed the sale? Or did he fail to justify his presidency? Or do you think his speech mattered at all?

Tell us what you think.

Posted by Magpie at September 2, 2004 08:52 PM | US Politics | Technorati links |
Comments

Couldn't stomach it myself. Watched John Kerry instead and was glad to see him fighting back.

Posted by: Silent Generation at September 2, 2004 09:22 PM

Flat. Nothing in it except a scary threat:
"freedom on the march"

Knowing that everything shrub says is Orwellian, it means freedom's going to keep marching right out the friggin' door and there's definitely plans for more wars.

Posted by: DougR at September 2, 2004 10:09 PM

I didn't have the stomach to watch it. I was flipping around cable and would end up catching maybe a line here or there but whatever was said - I would get pissed off at him and just change the channel.

Of coruse, what I really enjoyed was the fact the speech ran over 11 PM and the media networks didn't cut out like they threatened the DNC> Presidential Spoils.. Oh well, not like I was watching the networks anyway -- the Daily Show was coming on and I was NOT going to miss them laying into Zell Miller!

Posted by: John F. at September 3, 2004 06:53 AM

I watched it, while sitting in a chat room with a bunch of people from a blog I frequent, while also listening to Air America in the background.

It was actually awful. He was flat, monotonous with a complete lack of inflection. You can truely see how bad a public speaker (he misprounced Australia at one point) he truely is when he isn't pulling his hick good old boy routine.

The few things that scared me included that he spent a good number of minutes lambasting same-sex couples, not just a mention, he actually focused on us and how evil we are. Another thing that really scared me was his comment saying that the far majority of people in the middle east secretly prayed for democracy and would like it if we could give it to them (paraphasing - in effect he was asking for a crusade). And also how he STILL connected 911 to Iraq, oiy.

But Kerry did a great job later and made me feel considerably better. Looks like he's doing what he needs to and is taking the gloves off. But we'll see if he keeps up with this.

Sarah in Chicago

Posted by: Sarah at September 3, 2004 12:52 PM

I watched it, while sitting in a chat room with a bunch of people from a blog I frequent, while also listening to Air America in the background.

It was actually awful. He was flat, monotonous with a complete lack of inflection. You can truely see how bad a public speaker (he misprounced Australia at one point) he truely is when he isn't pulling his hick good old boy routine.

The few things that scared me included that he spent a good number of minutes lambasting same-sex couples, not just a mention, he actually focused on us and how evil we are. Another thing that really scared me was his comment saying that the far majority of people in the middle east secretly prayed for democracy and would like it if we could give it to them (paraphasing - in effect he was asking for a crusade). And also how he STILL connected 911 to Iraq, oiy.

But Kerry did a great job later and made me feel considerably better. Looks like he's doing what he needs to and is taking the gloves off. But we'll see if he keeps up with this.

Sarah in Chicago

Posted by: Sarah at September 3, 2004 12:53 PM

Listened on C-span today.

Broken. Record.

The 5 Iraquis who got new hands. No mention of 11,000 dead, or the 37 cases still pending of people tortured to death in US custody. Oh no,

Every good thing he said brought up vividly the fact that his record is amazingly bad. I am sure that his base loves him. I am not sure about the rest of the country.

We'll see.

Scorpio
Eccentricity

Posted by: Scorpio at September 3, 2004 01:38 PM

Actually, Michael Bérubé posted about it. I found out about him via Kevin Drum. He's an English professor at Penn State, native of NYC, incredibly funny. A few days ago he began pretending to be a new convert to the GOP ideology:

Live from New York!: Everyone wants to know: how could I do it? After a lifetime of believing passionately in egalitarian social justice, in democratic secularism, in human rights for every living human regardless of race, gender, sexuality, or disability, how could I flip to the Republicans in only one night of watching the convention on TV? Exactly how stupid or craven am I?

Well, let's try to figure out just whose horn is being swoggled, people. Do you know how much money we're talking about here? I've spent my adult life as a member of the liberal cultural elite, living in college towns and teaching literature. I thought I was pretty sharp, with my "postmodern" this and my "cultural studies" that. But do you have any idea how the real elite in this country live? Holy mother of God in a public creche, folks, you can't begin to imagine the perks around here. To hell with the cultural elite– they couldn't see Dick Cheney's tax bracket if the entire English department at Harvard stood on each other's shoulders. The political elite is where it's at, people, the economic elite. Now there's an elite. And let me tell you, it is mighty, mighty fine up here. No more Genny Cream Ale in cans for me– there's nothing in this suite but Macallan and Stoli. And the servants couldn't be nicer. Everyone here treats them with honest-to-God conservative compassion, and they seem to be just fine with that.

Where is all the money coming from, you ask? Well, from many sources, all of them legit, not like your drug-running, Holocaust-avoiding Soros fellow. But the main pipeline (so to speak!– that's a little joke in our suite) is Iraq appropriations. Remember that $8.8 billion that went "missing" last week? I'm looking at some of it right now, people. It's in a suitcase next to the hors d'oeuvres, and it's pretty goddamned impressive. Think Pulp Fiction. I can't say anything more at the moment, but I can assure you that it's being put to good use as I type.

[...]

First night For a quarter century, the name "Ed Koch" has been synonymous with integrity and rectitude. He's a beacon of sanity and light in dark times. If he says George Bush is our man, I think Democrats should sit up straight and listen.

And then McCain. What is there to say about McCain? McCain is McCain. The quintessential maverick, quintessentially mavericking all those other sucker-quintessential pseudo-mavericks who try to bring that weak shit to the hole. When he called Michael Moore a "disingenuous filmmaker," I realized that my own piddling critiques of Moore were so much dust in the wind. As McCain explained in his post-game interview with CNBC, Michael Moore's film suggested that Iraq under Saddam was some kind of Biblical paradise, and that's so wrong it's just . . .just . . . disingenuous, is what it is. Isn't it weird that Democrats won't say anything bad about Saddam? Rock on, John. The disingenuous must die!! Die, disingenuous Democrats, die!!

Posted by: James R MacLean at September 3, 2004 02:32 PM

I want to see how The Daily Show spins it tonight... This shoudl be hilarious. I wish the show was more than 30 minutes in length...

Posted by: John F. at September 3, 2004 06:04 PM